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We Will Remember Them

ELFORDS UNKNOWN SOLDIER
The text below was copied from a news paper clipping of the time
 
A Farewell letter
The Rev T Gilbert, rector of Elford writes as follows:- The mother of a young boy who was killed in france in August last has recieved after a long delay the unopened farewell letter which he wrote to her in case he did not return.
I was privileged to read the same and to quote extracts from it in the pulpit at Elford church on Sunday last which was the Patronal Feast of St Peter, Apostle and Martyr.
With your kind permission I should like to do the same in your columns, as I think it may be of interest and value to the wider audience.
 
He begins his letter by saying that he hopes the letter may never have to be opened and adds that "I want you all to remember me,not as the soldier that came home for a few short weeks ,but as I was before I joined the army.
I never was a soldier and no matter what happens I never shall be.
I intend if I come back to make my life in the country I hated towns.
You must not grieve when you learn I shall never return.
I know it will be a great shock but you must remember I died for you all to live the rest of your life in peace and happiness.
Please do not wear black clothes on my behalf I really mean that there is to much darkness and misery in the world-war without that.
I am writing this on the eve of leaving this country we all know full well that we shan't all return.
I want you to know that my last thoughts will have been of you.
My first thoughts each morning and my last each night is of you.
Don't forget I have longed to get home again after all this is over, You must know it was much better for me to die than return maimed for life or blind and unable to see the people and things I loved so much.
I only meant this to be short, just something to remember me by.
If I should fall grieve not that one so weak as I should die"
 
Mr Churchill in a famous and oft quoted appeal said there was nothing for it but blood, sweat and tears.
Here are "one" mothers tears mingled with the sweat and blood of her boy.
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For an look into how it was in the First World War go to the War Graves Commision  website (http://www.cwgc.org/education/) and click on  "One Boy" to hear and see a very interesting story.

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This Page Is Dedicated To The Memory Of The Dead Of Two World Wars To Whom We Owe A Never Ending Debt
The link below will take you to a very interesting website about the First World War it is full of records of what it was like on the front line well worth the time to look at it lest we should forget.
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THEY SHALL NOT GROW OLD
AS WE THAT ARE LEFT GROW OLD
AGE SHALL NOT WEARY THEM
NOR TIME CONDEMN
AT THE GOING DOWN OF THE SUN
AND IN THE MORNING
WE WILL REMEMBER THEM

LEST WE SHOULD FORGET
poster.jpg
To the thousands who laid down their lives for others
This page is dedicated to the memory of the brave men who laid down their lives in the great war 1914-1919 and in the second world war 1939-45 in the hope that their terrible ordeal will never be forgotten by future generations.
The following roll of honour is for those who are remembered on the war memorial in Elford Church or are connected to the village in some way.
We also keep in mind all that have died in the wars around the world since this time.
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The names and details following this text are of the men of or associated with Elford there are many thousands more many unknown to whom we owe a never ending debt.
 All details can be found at The Commonwealth War Graves Commision at
 
The War Memorial
warm.jpg
in Elford Church
1914-19

Walter Greville
waltergrenvillebagotchester001.jpg
Bagot-Chester

IN MEMORY OF
Captain Walter Greville Bagot-Chester
3/3rd Gurkha Rifles
Died of wounds in Palistine
on 28/03/1918 aged 31
Buried at Ramleh War cemetery
ISRAEL

C

aptain Walter Greville Bagot-Chester was the son of the Reverend Algernon SM and Mrs Bagot-Chester of Elford House Ferring Worthing, former rector of Elford near Tamworth. He passed high out of Sandhurst in 1908 and was gazetted to the Indian Army in 1909, joining the Queen Alexandra's Own Gurkha Rifles at Landsdowne. When the Indian Corps came to France he was sent in advance as embarkation officer. On the arrival of the regiment he took part in several actions, including the Battles of Neuve Chapelle, Richeborg and Loos. In the latter action, Walter was severely wounded, his right shoulder being shattered, and six other wounds being received as he lay out for 12 hours in a "pip squeak" hole with one of his wounded Gurkhas, with the Germans continually firing at him. Heavy rain came on and the two were lying latterly in mud and water from 6 am to 8 pm when they managed to creep back to their lines. After a year of convalescence, Walter rejoined his regiment, which was now in Egypt. Here he was transferred from the 2/3rd to the 3/3rd Gurkhas, which was then formed as a new battalion. Walter was with his regiment in the advance from Gaza to Jerusalem. On the first day of the operations he was sent in command of his company to raid a Turkish outpost, which was accomplished so successfully that he received congratulations from Headquarters and was awarded the Military Cross, which was listed in the London Gazette of 18 February 1918. 16 prisoners were brought back on this occasion. On 25 November 1917, he was again wounded at Nebi Samwill near Jerusalem. Of this affair his Colonel wrote, "Captain Bagot-Chester is a most gallant officer. He was splendid at Nebi Samwill and I have recommended him for a bar to his Military Cross". Walter was in hospital until January 1918 when he again rejoined his battalion, taking part in the advance north of Jerusalem, until the date of the wound that resulted in his death. There are two entries in the "Herald" concerning Walter’s death. The first appears in the edition of 13 April 1918, and the second in the issue of 20 April 1918.

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The two photographs below show Captain Bagot-Chesters grave at Ramleh War Cemetrey Israel.

bagotchester01.jpg

bagotchester02.jpg

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George
georgephillips1.jpg
Phillips

In Memory of
Private GEORGE PHILLIPS
9285,1st Bn.,North Staffordshire Regiment
who died age 23
on Tuesday 13 October 1914.
Private  PHILLIPS,Son of John and Maria Phillips
of Elford,Tamworth,Staffs.
Remembered with honour
PLOEGSTEERT MEMORIAL
Private George Phillips arrived in France on the 10th of September 1914 and met his death only five weeks later at Place Pardelles in the battle of Armentieres during the 1914 operations in Flanders in this action the 1st North Staffords lost a total of 12 officers and men
PRIVATE GEORGE PHILLIPS
phillips1.jpg
NORTH STAFFORDSHIRE REGIMENT
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In Memory Of
Private Arthur Bannister
241145 1/6th Prince of Wales (north Stafforshire Regiment)
The Hill Elford
Died France 30/06/1917 aged 22yrs
Private Arthur Bannister was the son of William and Lucy Bannister of the above address and lived in Great Heywood Staffordshire.
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Anthony George
anthonygeorgeattwoodmorris.jpg
Attwood Morris

In Memory of
Lieutenant ANTHONY GEORGE ATWOOD MORRIS
1st Bn.,Kings Own(Royal Lancaster Regt)
WHO DIED AGE 27
on Tuesday 13 october 1914
Lieutenant MORRIS Son of Mr&MrsF.A.Morris
of Pailton House,Rugby.
Remembered with Honour
METEREN ISOLATED GRAVE
Lieutenant Anthony George Attwood Morriswas born in Elford the youngest son of Mr&Mrs F A Morris of the above address who owned Messers Morris and Shaw Ltd Birch Coppice colliery.
Anthony was born inMay 1887 was educated at Winchester and joined the Royal Lancaster Regiment as a Second Lieutenant from the Military at the end of 1907 being gazetted Lieutenant in April 1911.
He arrived in France on the 10th of September 1914 and met his death near Meteren during the battle of Armentieres when he and the severn men of the machine gun section that he commanded were caught by German fire originally all eight men were buried in the churchyard in Meteren but after the war when the other soldierswere reburied Merteren Military Cemetery Anthony's parents decided to take thier son's body home for reburial after reaching Calais Mr & Mrs Morris learned that what they were proposing to do was not allowed and they therefore returned the body to Meteren where Anthony was buried with his men. His parents then arranged to purchase two hectares of land which encompassed the spot where thier son was killed on this land an elaborate open sided building of brick with a tiled roof and a large clock which came from the Morris's stables in England was constucted in due course Anthony's body was moved to its final resting place which the community of Meteren is responsible for maintaining to this day.
There is a website about Lieutenant Morris @
click on the link and it will take you to it
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In Memory of
Lieutenant JOHN BOYER WEBB
4th Bn., North Staffordshire Regiment
WHO DIED AGE 20
on Wednesday 21 April 1915
Lieutenant WEBB,Son of the late Charles Boyer and Adela Dorothy Webb
of Elford House,Elford,Staffs
Remembered with Honour
RAILWAY DUGOUTS BURIAL GROUND

John
johnboyerwebb.jpg
Boyer Webb

L

ieutenant John Boyer Webb was the only son of Captain Charles Boyer and Adela Dorothy Webb of the above address. Jack as he was known was born in Elford on 8 June 1894 and was educated at Harrow and Trinity College, Cambridge, where he gained numerous scholarships and medals for his work. Jack received his commission on 7 August 1914 and after being quartered in Guernsey with the North Staffords, with whom his father had served in the Boer War and his grandfather had commanded he arrived in France on the 17 March 1915. Jack was attached to the 1st Bedfordshire Regiment and had been promoted to Lieutenant on 1 April 1915 when he met his death at Hill 60, near Zillebeke. There is an article regarding Jack’s death in the "Herald" of 1 May 1915.


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IN MEMORY OF
Private James Webster
8th Gloucestershire Regiment
Killed in action in France 30/07/1916
commemorated on the
Thiepval Memorial France

 

P

rivate James Webster was born in Elford, and arrived in France on 18 July 1915. James met his death during the Battle of the Somme, when 19 Division, to whom his battalion belonged, was involved in an attack on German positions in the Switch Line, near Martinpuich. In this action the 8 Gloucesters lost a total of 57 officers and men killed. No information regarding James’s death is recorded in the Tamworth Herald.

 

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Frank
frankmarsh1.jpg
Marsh

In Memory of
Private FRANK MARSH
1988,6thBn.,North Staffordshire Regiment
WHO DIED AGE 22
on Thursday 14 October 1915
Private MARSH,Son of Frank and Eliza Emily Marsh.Born at Birmingham
Remembered with Honour
ABBEVILLE COMMUNAL CEMETRY
 

P

rivate Frank Marsh was born in Birmingham and lived in Elford, the son of Frank and Eliza Emily Marsh. His father was clerk to the Parish Council, and prior to the war Frank was employed by Marsh and Sons, photographers as well as being for two and a half years a member of the Tamworth Territorials. After being posted initially to the Luton area, the battalion arrived in France on 4 March 1915 and first went into action near Wulverghem in Belgium. Frank received the wound that he died from during the Battle of Loos when the 1/6th North Staffords, together with the other battalions of 46 Division took part in a charge on the German positions at The Dump near Vermelles. During the charge Frank was badly wounded and taken to hospital, but died on the ambulance train. The fighting on 13 October 1915 was extremely severe with the 1/6th North Staffords alone suffering a total of 93 officers and men killed. There is an article regarding Frank’s death, together with a photograph, in the "Herald" of 23 October 1915.

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In Memory of
Cook's Mate 2nd Class GEORGE ROBERT CLEMENT
M/11195,H.M.S."NATAL",Royal Navy
WHO DIED AGE 20
on Thursday 30 December 1915
Cook's Mate 2nd Class CLEMENT,Son of George and Margret Clement,of 8 Citizen Dwellings,Provost St,City Rd London
Remembered with Honour
CHATHAM NAVAL MEMORIAL
The Gravestone to The memory of
grclement.jpg
G.R.Clement in Elford Churchyard

 

C

ooks Mate 2nd Class George Robert Clement was the son of George and Margaret Clement of 8 Citizen Dwellings, Provost Street, City Road, London and the grandson of Thomas Clement of the Green Elford.  George was killed when the 13,550 ton armoured cruiser, HMS Natal, with a complement of 704 officers and men blew up in the Cromarty Firth, Scotland. The Natal was lying in harbour when fire broke out on board. Within a short time the ship was torn asunder by the explosion of her after magazine and sank almost immediately. The loss of life was heavy amounting to 25 officers, including the Captain, and 380 ratings. There is an article regarding George's death in the "Herald" of 22 January 1916. Although his name does not appear on any of the war memorials of Tamworth and district George's name is recorded on the gravestone of his parents who are buried in the graveyard of St Peter's Church, Elford, Tamworth.

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In Memory of
Private JOHN ADDERLEY
16866,7thBn., North Staffordshire Regiment
WHO DIED AGE 37
on Saturday15 April 1916
Remembered with Honour
AMARA WAR CEMETERY
Private John Adderley was born in Gnosall Staffordshire and lived with his wife Hannah Elizabeth in Elford.
Prior to enlisting in the army John was employed as a labourer.
During 1915 John initially served in the Gallipoli campaign before his regiment was sent to Mesopotamia.
The battalion arrived in Mesopotamia in Febuary 1916 and John met his death just two months later.
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John
johnbutler.jpg
Butler

In Memory of
Private JOHN BUTLER
240229,1st/6thBn.,North Staffordshire Regiment
WHO DIED
on Saturday 1 July 1916
Remembered with Honour
THIEPVAL MEMORIAL
Private John Butler was born in Elford and was the husband of Mrs J Butler of  Victoria Crescent Tamworth.
John was a member of the Tamworth Territorials who arrived in France on the 4th of March 1915 and first went into action near Wulverghem in Belgium.
After taking part in the Battle of Loos in 1915 the battalion was involved inthe Battle of the Somme it was here on the first day of this battle that John met his death during an unsuccessful attack on German lines at Gommecourt.
On the 1st of July 1916 the 1/6 North Staffords lost a total of 170 officers and men killed the bodies of the dead remained in no mans land untill the Germans withdrew to better fortified positions in March 1917 although many of the bodies were retrieved and buried due to the effects of exposure thier identity could not be established however it is likely that John is buried in Gommecourt Wood New Cemetery as this contains the bodies of 464 soldiers whose identity could not be established when smaller battlefield cemeteries were concentrated together in one place after the end of the war.
Private John Butler
butler.jpg
Elford Churchyard
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In Memory of
Private ELLIS VAUGHAN WILLIAMS
16580 1st Bn., North Staffordshire Regiment
WHO DIED AGE 25
on Wednesday 13 June 1917
Private WILLIAMS,Son of Martha and the late Henry Williams,of The Kennels,Elford,Tamworth,Staffs
Remembered with Honour
LIJSSENTHOEK MILITARY CEMETERY
 
Memorial Stone to Ellis Vaughan Williams
evwilliams.jpg
in Elford Churchyard

 

P

rivate Ellis Vaughan Williams was the son of Henry and Martha Williams of the above address, Prior to the war Ellis was employed as a wheelwright and initially he served in the 7 North Staffords, seeing service at Gallipoli in 1915. Ellis met his death at number 18 Casualty Clearing Station, Belgium, from wounds incurred in the Battle of Messines, during the Flanders Offensive of 1917. There is an entry reporting Ellis’s death in the "Herald" of 14 July 1917.

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Alfred George
alfredgeorgemewis.jpg
Mewis

In Memory of
Rifleman ALFRED GEORGE MEWIS
42822, 12th Bn.,Royal Irish Rifles
WHO DIED AGE 19
on Saturday 11 August 1917
Rifleman MEWIS,Son of Henry and Alice Mewis,of The Arch,Elford,Tamworth,Staffs.
Remembered with Honour
YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL
 

 

R

ifleman Alfred George Mewis was the second son of Henry and Alice Mewis of the above address, whose eldest son also served in the war. Prior to joining the army in August 1916, Alfred was employed by Mr Cripwell, Home Farm, Elford, and also by Mr Hodgetts of Haselour. Initially Alfred served in the Army Service Corps (service number T4/233611), but prior to being sent to France was transferred to the Royal Irish Rifles. There is an article regarding Alfred’s death, together with a photograph, in the "Herald" of 8 September 1917.

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IN MEMORY OF
Private Allan Sanders Toone
9 Kings Own(Yorkshire Light Infantry)
Killed in action in France
24/03/1918
Commemorated on the
Pozieres Memorial France

 

P

rivate Allan Sanders Toone came from Hinckley and was the husband of Ellen Toone who after the war remarried and lived at Fisherwick and Elford where she died in 1973, age 86. Allan met his death in the Battle of St Quentin during the early days of the 1918 German Spring Offensive. Although there is no entry regarding his death in the "Herald", "In Memoriam" entries appear in the editions of 18 May 1918, 29 March 1919, and 27 March 1920. Despite this, Allan's name does not appear on any of the war memorials of Tamworth and district.

 

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IN MEMORY OF
Gunner Wilfred Henry Nash
69 Siege Battery, Royay Garrison Artillery
Killed in action in France
11/02/1918 Aged 35
Buried at Roclincourt Miliary Cemetery
France

 

G

unner Wilfred Henry Nash was married with six children and lived in Elford. Prior to enlisting in the army in 1916, Wilfred was employed as woodman on the Elford estate, under Howard F Paget. At the time of his death Wilfred had been in France about 12 months, distinguishing himself by winning the Military Medal, the award of which was announced in the London Gazette of 28 September 1917. Wilfred was killed instantly when his battery was suddenly shelled by the Germans, and he was buried in a military cemetery behind the lines, his officers and comrades attending the burial. There is an article regarding Wilfred’s death in the "Herald" of 23 February 1918
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IN MEMORY OF
Surgeon Kenelm Mitchell Dyott
Royal Navy (HMS Stephen Furness)
Killed in action in the north sea
13/12/1917 aged 29
Commemorated on the
Portsmouth Navel Memorial

 

S

urgeon Kenelm Mitchell Dyott was the son of George R and Caroline M Dyott of Whittington and the husband of Fanny Desiree Howard Dyott of the Hall Elford. Kenelm met his death when the 1,712 ton Armed Boarding Steamer HMS Stephen Furness was sunk by the German submarine UB64 in the Irish Sea west of the Isle of Man. The ship sank with the loss of six officers and 95 ratings. No information regarding Kenelm's death is recorded in the Tamworth Herald and his name does not appear on any of the war memorials of Tamworth and district.

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IN MEMORY OF
Private Edward Keeling
407 Agricultural Company,Labour Corps
Died in England
23/03/1919 aged30
Buried at St Bartholomews Churchyard
Hints Tamworth

 

P

rivate Edward Keeling was the son of George and Mary Keeling and the husband of A Keeling of The Hill Elford. Edward originally served in the Yorkshire Regiment (service number 45415), and was later attached to 407 Agricultural Company, Labour Corps. No information regarding Edward’s death is recorded in the Tamworth Herald, and his name is not recorded on any of the war memorials of Tamworth and district.

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link to war graves commision
wgc.jpg
1939-45
In Memory of
Signalman KENNETH WILLIAM CLARKE STEVENS
2342130
WHO DIED AGE 28
on Friday 4 May 1945
Signalman STEVENS,Son of George Walter and Margaretta Stevens,of The Gardens,Elford,Tamworth,Staffs
Remembered with Honour
ELFORD (ST.PETERS) CHURCHYARD
The Grave of Ken Stevens
kstevens.jpg
in Elford Churchyard

William
howardofrepulse.jpg
Howard Paget

In Memory of
Engine Room Artificer PAGET
5thCl.WILLIAM HOWARD PAGET,C/MX.61419.R.N.H.M.S.Repulse,Royal Navy
WHO DIED AGE 21
on Wednesday 10 December 1941
Engine Room Artificer PAGET,Son of Salisbury Howard Paget and Florence May Paget, of Whittington,Staffordshire.
Remembered with Honour
CHATHAM NAVAL MEMORIAL
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In Memory of
Private ROBERT PHILLIP SMITH
14654555,7th Bn.,South Staffordshire Regiment
WHO DIED AGE 19
on Tuesday 15 August 1944
Private SMITH,Son of Robert and Marguerite Louise Smith,of Elford,Staffordshire
Remembered with Honour
BATEUX WAR CEMETERY
 
Private Robert Phillip Smith
smith.jpg
Elford Churchyard

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM

WW2 HOME GUARD
dadsarmy
OUTSIDE HASELOUR HALL

I had the honour of knowing the parents of two of the men named on this page Ken Stevens parents lived two doors from us at The Gardens I can just remember Mrs Stevens but knew Mr Stevens untill his death in 1970.
Both Kens parents and grandparents are buried along side him in Elford churchyard he was named after his grandfather whose name was William Clarke.
Robert Smiths parents lived at The Forge they had two other children a son Peter and a Daughter Joy Peter as now passed away and is buried in Elford churchyard joy before she got married ran the Brownies and Girl Guides in the village.  
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Richard Cowley is compiling a book on local people in the first world war when completed it is hoped to place it in the church for all to see.
There is one site I would draw your attention to it is covered by copyright so I cannot reproduce it on this site but if you go to www.hellfire-corner.demon.co.uk/terriers2.htm you will find the story of hellfire corner Private Frank Marsh (see above) is mentioned in the story you will not belive how many men could die in one day please read it.
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